Documents You Need To Apply for a Small Business Loan

by Crestmark 19. September 2012 05:22

 

When you apply for a small business loan, you'll be required to provide several items regarding your company and its financial situation. While it may seem difficult to get this various paperwork together, it’s good for both parties that this documentation is required: it helps ensure that the final loan you're offered is what's best for you, something that you can afford and that really fits your needs. While the exact documents needed may vary between loan types, everything on this list is virtually guaranteed to be useful during the application process.

Business Plan

In order to be granted small business capital through the SBA, you'll need to show evidence of a solid business plan to show future steps and goals. In many cases, the required information could go well beyond the business plan. Additionally, you'll need to show personal information to identify yourself, and sometimes include a resume that shows your leadership and management experience.

Credit Reports & Tax Returns

Expect the prospective lender to pull your individual credit report and the credit report for your business, if you have already started it. Before you apply, it's smart to pull your own report(s) and check them for inaccuracies. It's not uncommon for the reports to have an error or two, , and even a slight problem could have a big impact when you are applying for credit or a loan. By the same token, most lenders will want to see three years of personal and business tax returns (if you have them).

Financial Statements

You will likely need to show your personal and business financial statements to the lender. This helps them determine your small business capital needs and how much debt you can realistically afford to carry. Expect to present both financial statements of your own and documents from your current bank.

Agreements, Leases, and Licenses

If you've had to fill out any kind of official form or agreement, you'll likely need to present it as part of the loan. This applies to articles of incorporation, any kind of local business licenses or accreditations required in your area, franchise agreements, and lease arrangements. And in some cases, you may be asked to provide information on who your customers are.

This is not an exhaustive list covering every potential situation for every lender. You should always check and ask them what, specifically, they'll want to see so that you can be prepared. But if you're just starting the process and want to have some idea of what they're looking for, this list is a good starting point. 

 

Bookmark and Share

What Is Recapitalization Financing?

by Crestmark 12. September 2012 06:15

There are many different ways to fund a business. Starting out, you'll have the option to lean heavily on venture capital or similar investment vehicles, but you may also choose to finance through more traditional loans, or potentially even to self-finance. But as your business develops, you may discover that your initial financing method isn't the one that best suits your current needs. In this kind of situation, it'll be time to look at recapitalization financing.

The Funds You Need To Restructure

Recapitalization financing is, at its heart, a way of re-organizing the way the finances of your company are structured. This can mean consolidation, but it often means adapting payment structures to better fit your current method of production. For example, it could mean switching from a more debt-oriented structure to a line-of-credit oriented one.

Changing Your Business Capital

At Crestmark, we often help our clients transfer to lines of credit as their main source of business capital. We offer four main types of line of credit. The first is an asset-based line of credit, which is secured by inventory and/or receivables. Accounts receivable financing is another common choice. This kind of line of credit is secured purely by invoices with every invoice being considered individually. Finally, the last two common options are both types of invoice factoring. Factoring offers flexible financing that functions very similarly to a line of credit but is not technically considered one. Under an invoice factoring agreement Crestmark structures your funding facility based on accounts receivable/invoices. The invoices are purchased at a discount to provide immediate availability of funds to your company

If you're interested in learning how Crestmark can assist you with recapitalization, don't hesitate to contact us. We're always looking to help business owners looking for financial solutions. 

Bookmark and Share

Facebook LinkedIn Bookmark and Share

© 2009 Crestmark Bank ® All rights reserved.    | Community Reinvestment Notice | Privacy | Legal | Member FDIC